Gravity Light – Lighting a billion lives

Over 1.2 billion people globally have no access to electricity and millions more have an unreliable supply. Instead, they use dangerous, polluting and expensive kerosene lamps for light. Solution to this problem was designed by two designers.

Jim Reeves is a London based designer and along with Martin Riddiford, he has spent four years developing a light that would provide a viable alternative to kerosene and sun-powered lamps for developing nations.

GravityLight works by harnessing the power of weight and gravity, it is easy to run, low-energy, battery-free and also, cheaper than solar lighting.

Combining kinetic and potential energy, GravityLight works by connecting an elevated weight — filled with rocks or sand — to a pulley system that slowly powers a generator as the weight falls to the ground.

GravityLight’s creators are looking to test and begin mass-production on this innovative design, in the hopes of brightening peoples’ lives when it gets dark.

GravityLight is an important development because 60% of female, adult, non-smokers, are getting lung cancer from inhaling the fumes of commonly-used kerosene lamps.

Designed specially for people in developing countries like Africa and India with no access to mains electricity, the lamp generates enough energy for half an hour of light when holding weight for just a few seconds.

Jim Reeves on TED talks

If you like to fund this idea, see their campaign on Indiegogo. For more visit The GravityLight Foundation.

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    • GravityLight works by connecting an elevated weight — filled with rocks or sand — to a pulley system that slowly powers a generator as the weight falls to the ground.

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